Saying what we mean & meaning what we say: Multi-versity and Uni-versity – What difference does it make?

  • Peter Hlabse University of Notre Dame

Abstract

Over the course of this consideration, I explore the philosophical commitments that result in the idea of a ‘university’ as well as the implicit philosophical commitments that result in the idea of a ‘multiversity’.  That is to say, I consider how conceptions about the nature of the universe and the human person influence conceptions about the nature, purpose, and ultimately, the justification of the distinctively uni-versity and multi-versity.


I hope to accomplish three tasks by this consideration’s end: (1) Provide an adequate historical sketch of the development of the higher education institutions in the West, universities and multiversities alike.  (2) Draw attention to the philosophical and organizational commitments inherent and unique to each project (university and multiversity) and thereby begin the process of gaining a greater precision and thoughtfulness when speaking of each project. (3) Establish that a revival of a basic philosophical grammar centered on the human person is necessary in order to establish a rational, defensible, and sustainable foundation and justification for the projects of the university and of higher education.

Published
Jun 21, 2017
How to Cite
HLABSE, Peter. Saying what we mean & meaning what we say: Multi-versity and Uni-versity – What difference does it make?. Colloquia, Academic Journal of Culture and Thought, [S.l.], v. 1, p. 1 - 16, june 2017. ISSN 1390-8731. Available at: <http://colloquia.uhemisferios.edu.ec/index.php/colloquia/article/view/1>. Date accessed: 20 nov. 2017.